When both iliac systems are occluded below an abdominal aortic aneurysm: hybrid techniques on the cutting edge

preop CTA EVAR-ENDORE.jpg
AAA with iliac arterial occlusion -arrows point to right external iliac and left common iliac arterial occlusions

The patient is an 70 year old man referred for evaluation of claudication that occurred at under a block of walking. He reported no rest pain or tissue loss. He smoked heavily up to a pack a day, with congestive heart failure with an ejection fraction of 40%, prior history of myocardial infarction treated with PTCA, and pacemaker, and moderate dyspnea on exertion.

On examination, patient had a flaccid abdomen through which the AAA could be palpated, and he had no palpable femoral artery pulse bilaterally, nor anything below. He had a cardiac murmur and moderate bilateral edema. Preoperative risk evaluation placed him in the high risk category because of his heart failure, coronary artery disease, and his mild to moderate pulmonary disease.
CTA (pictured above and below) showed a 5.1cm infrarenal AAA with an hourglass shaped neck with moderate atherosclerosis in the neck, an occluded left common iliac artery with external iliac artery reconstitution via internal iliac artery collaterals, and a right external iliac artery occlusion with common femoral artery reconstitution. There was calcified right common femoral artery plaque.

Preop left and right centerlines EVAR-ENDORE.jpg

Treatment options included open surgical aortobifemoral bypass with exclusion of the AAA, total endovascular repair with some form of endo-conduit revascularization of the occluded segments of iliac artery, or a hybrid repair.

Open aortic repair in patients with heart failure and moderate COPD can be performed safely (ref 1). Dr. Hollier et al, in the golden age of open repair, reported a 5.7% mortality rate operating on 106 patients with severe category of heart, lung, kidney, or liver disease.

Typically, the hybrid repair involves sewing in a conduit to deliver the main body of a bifurcated or unibody stent graft when endovascular access is not possible. Despite techniques to stay minimally invasive -largely by staying retroperitoneal, this is not a benign procedure (ref 2). Nzara et al reviewed 15,082 patients from the NSQIP database breaking out 1% of patients who had conduit or direct puncture access.

Matched analyses of comorbidities revealed that patients requiring [conduit or direct access] had higher perioperative mortality (6.8% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.008), cardiac (4.8% vs. 1%, P = 0.004), pulmonary (8.8% vs. 3.4%, P = 0.006), and bleeding complications (10.2% vs. 4.6%, P = 0.016).

Despite these risks, I have performed AUI-FEM-FEM with good results with the modification of deploying the terminus of the stent graft across an end to end anastomosis of the conduit graft to the iliac artery (below), resulting in seal and avoiding the problems of bleeding from the usually heavily diseased artery

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Aorto-uni-iliac stent graft across end to end conduit anastomosis to fem-fem bypass

The iliac limbs of some stent graft systems will have proximal flares and can be used in a telescoping manner to create an aorto-uni-iliac (AUI) configuration in occlusive disease. The Cook RENU converter has a 22mm tall sealing zone designed for deployment inside another stent graft and would conform poorly to this kind of neck as a primary  AUI endograft which this was not designed to act as. The Endurant II AUI converter has a suprarenal stent which I preferred to avoid in this patient as the juxtarenal neck likely was aneurysmal and might require future interventions

I chose to perform a right sided common femoral cutdown and from that exposure, perform an iliofemoral remote endarterectomy of the right external iliac to common femoral artery. This in my experience is a well tolerated and highly durable procedure (personal data). Kavanagh et al (ref 3) presented their experience with iliofemoral EndoRE and shared their techniques. This would create the lumenal diameter necessary to pass an 18F sheath to deliver an endograft. I chose the Gore Excluder which would achieve seal in the hourglass shaped neck and allow for future visceral segment intervention if necessary without having a suprarenal stent in the way. I planned on managing the left common iliac artery via a percutaneous recanalization.

The patient’s right common femoral artery was exposed in the usual manner. Wire access across the occluded external iliac artery was achieved from a puncture of the common femoral artery. Remote endarterectomy (EndoRE) was performed over a wire from the common femoral artery to the external iliac artery origin (pictures below).

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External iliac to common femoral artery plaque removed with Moll ring cutter (LeMaitre Vascular) over a wire

The 18F sheath went up with minimal resistance, and the EVAR was performed in the usual manner. The left common iliac artery occlusion was managed percutaneously from a left brachial access. The stent graft on the left was terminated above the iliac bifurcation and a self expanding stent was used to extend across the iliac bifurcation which had a persistent stenosis after recanalization.

The patient recovered well and was sent home several days postprocedure. He returned a month later with healed wounds and palpable peripheral pulses. He no longer had claudication and CTA showed the aneurysm sac to have no endoleak (figures below).

post CTA EVAR-ENDORE

postop centerline EVAR-ENDORE
Composite imaging showing normal appearing right iliofemoral segment (EIA + CFA) and patent left common iliac artery.

Discussion
I have previously posted on using EndoRE (remote endarterectomy) for both occlusive disease and as an adjunct in EVAR. Iliofemoral EndoRE has excellent patency in the short and midterm, and in my experience has superior patency compared to the femoropopliteal segment where EndoRE is traditionally used. This case illustrates both scenarios. While the common iliac artery occlusions can be expected to have acceptable patencies with percutaneous interventions, the external iliac lesions typically fail when managed percutaneously especially when the stents are extended across the inguinal ligament. The external iliac artery is quite mobile and biologically, in my opinon, behaves much as the popliteal artery and not like the common iliac. Also, the common femoral arterial plaque is contiguous with the external iliac plaque, making in my mind, imperative to clear out all the plaque rather than what can just be seen through a groin exposure.

On microscopy, the external iliac artery is restored to a normal patent artery -I have sent arterial biopsies several months after endarterectomy and the artery felt and sewed like a normal artery and had normal structure on pathology. This implies that the external iliac can be restored to a near normal status and patients that are turned down for living related donor transplantation of kidneys can become excellent recipients. In this case, this hybrid approach effectively treated his claudication but also sealed off his moderate sized AAA while not precluding future visceral segment surgery or intervention with a large suprarenal stent.

 

Reference

  1. Hollier LH et al. J Vasc Surg 1986; 3:712-7.
  2. Nzara R et al. Ann Vasc Surg. 2015 Nov;29(8):1548-53
  3. Kavanagh CM et al. J Vasc Surg 2016;64:1327-34

The femoral bifurcation does not tolerate endovascular miscalculation

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The patient presented with complaints of leg and foot pain with sitting and short distance calf claudication, being unable to walk more than 100 feet. This is unusual because sitting usually relieves ischemic rest pain. He is in late middle age and developed claudication a year prior to presentation that was treated with stent grafting of his superficial femoral artery from its origin to Hunter’s canal at his local hospital. This relieved his claudication only briefly, but when the pain recurred a few months after treatment, it was far worse than what he had originally. Now, when he sat at his desk, his foot would go numb very quickly and he would have to lie down to relieve his pain.

On examination, the patient was moderately obese with overhanging belly. He had a palpable right femoral pulse, but nothing below was palpable. He had multiphasic signals in the dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial arteries. The left leg had a normal arterial exam. Pulse volume recording and segmental pressures were measured:

preop PVR2

These are taken with the patient lying down which was the position that relieved his pain, and the PVR’s show some diminishment of inflow. It would be easy at this point to declare the patient’s pain to be due to neuropathy or spinal stenosis, but because of his inability to walk more than a hundred feet and because of his severe pain with sitting, I went ahead and obtained a CTA.

3DVR

The CTA showed he had an occluded superficial femoral artery (SFA) with patent profunda femoral artery (PFA) with reconstitution of an above knee popliteal artery with multivessel runoff. The 3DVR image showed his inguinal crease to be right over the femoral bifurcation which is not an unsual finding, but his stent graft was partially occluding his profunda femoral artery.

CTA centerline

I decided to take him to the operating room to relieve his PFA of this obstruction. My plan was to remove the stent graft at the origin of the SFA and at the same time, remove the plaque and occluded stent graft from his SFA to restore it to patency.

In the OR, on exposing his SFA, I discovered that because of his overhanging belly, his inguinal ligament had sagged and was compressing his femoral bifurcation.

Sketch185115048

This explained his presentation. The stent graft really had no chance as when he sat, the belly and ligament compressed it at the origin, and because it partially occluded the origin of the PFA, sitting probably pinched off flow completely. The 3dVR image shows the mid segment of PFA to have little contrast density -this is not because of thrombus, but because of the obstruction, the PFA was getting collateral flow from the hypogastric artery.

The stent graft was removed at its origin via a longitudinal arteriotomy after remote endarterectomy of the distal graft.

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In this case, the Multitool (LeMaitre) was useful in dissecting the plaque and stent graft because of its relatively stiff shaft compared to the standard Vollmer rings. The technique of EndoRE has been described in prior posts (link).

procedure picture

The stent graft came out in a single segment -they come out easier than bare stents.

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post angio compositeThe patient regained palpable pulses in his right foot and recovered well, being discharged home after a 4 day stay.

While one could argue that just taking out the short piece of occlusive stent graft over the PFA was all that was necessary, I feel that there is no added harm in sending down a dissector around the stent, and in this patient there was restoration of his SFA patency which was the intent of the original procedure.

Unlike PTFE bypasses that sometimes fail with thromboembolism, SFA EndoRE fails with development of focal stenoses. From a conversation I had with Dr. Frans Moll at the VEITH meeting, I found that he has had good experience with using drug coated balloons in the treatment of these recurrent stenoses.

At the time of discharge, the patient was relieved of his rest pain, and was no longer claudicating. The common femoral artery, its bifurcation, and the profunda femoral artery remain resistent to attempts at endovascular treatment, and remain in the domain of open surgery. And in retrospect, the history and physical examination had all the clues to the eventual answer to the oddities of the patient’s complaints. The combination of inguinal crease, abdominal pannus, and low hanging inguinal ligament meant these structures acted to crush the stent graft and femoral bifurcation.

The Ilio-femoral-popliteal remote endarterectomy -The Concept Behind Extended Remote Endarterectomy is Moving Inflow from the Groin to the Knee

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Why perform such an extensive endarterectomy when just a few stents will do? This is a valid question, given the relative safety of interventions and the durability of bypasses. There are three reasons why ilio-femoral-popliteal endarterectomy works well in my practice.

  1. Minimally invasive
  2. Restore elasticity and collaterals
  3. Move the inflow point from the groin to the knee

The procedure is minimally invasive. Take for example this patient whose plaque is shown above. He had a common femoral occlusion for which a common femoral endarterectomy was aborted when the prior surgeon ran into excessive bleeding. Workup for coagulopathy was negative and the patient came to me with rest pain. Pedal level pulses were not palpable, and the signals were barely there.

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CTA showed that he had a CFA occlusion as well as SFA occlusion.

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Because the common femoral plaque is contiguous with the external iliac plaque, it is often simpler to complete a remote endarterectomy over wire up to the external iliac origin than to try to get a satisfactory end point at the inguinal ligament -I do not like stenting across the ligament into the patch which is the usual bailout if the end point causes a stenosis. It is far simpler to apply a stent at the external iliac origin.

The popliteal end point was chosen where the visible plaque was no longer apparent in the patent artery. The goal is to cut across thin intima, and frequently no distal stent is required because a secure end point is achieved much like the “feathered endpoint” seen in carotid endarterectomies.

Termini

distal end point

My intention was to endarterectomize the atherosclerotic plaque from the external iliac origin to popliteal artery via the groin incision marked in orange.

3DVR allows for planning the operation in great detail
3DVR allows for planning the operation in great detail

The video shows the setup and motion in dissecting the plaque.

The plaque came out easily (first image, top).The proximal and distal end points required stents.

Before and after
Before and after

The patient regained palpable dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial artery pulses. Total OR time was less than 2 hours. An ilioinguinal field block allowed for good pain control and the patient was discharged the next morning, having to heal only a 10cm wound. There is no good endovascular option for common femoral disease, and while stenting the whole SFA can be done, on more than a few occasions I have had to treat occluded “full metal jacket” SFA stents, usually by removing them. EndoRE has been shown to be superior to PTFE and almost as good as vein in the REVAS Trial when compared to fem-AK POP bypass. Going home the next day after such an extensive revascularization is not a stunt -it’s the direct result of limiting the incision and blood loss and OR time.

2. Restore Elasticity and Collaterals -Arterial Restoration

One of the components of arterial flow that is lost with atherosclerotic disease is arterial elasticity. That is the stretchiness of the artery in response to pressure. Elastic distension and recoil account for significant portions of forward flow during diastole which is lost with atherosclerotic plaque. As plaque builds up, and the artery becomes stiffer. The artery that goes through remote endarterectomy regains this elasticity. Ultrastructure from a recanalized external iliac artery sampled from a punch arteriotomy for a cross ilio-femoral bypass showed that three months after endarterectomy, the external iliac artery was ultrastructurally normal per pathology report.

Also, collaterals that were previously occluded are seen to be restored to patency. This has an important impact on patency and any future failures. The endarterectomized arteries fail due to the presence of isolated, random fragments of medial smooth muscle which cause focal TASC A restenoses. These are easily amenable to balloon angioplasty. If the revascularization fails, there is no catastrophic thromboembolism that is typical of PTFE thromboses -rather the collaterals keep segments open and it is straightforward to thrombectomize or lyse the artery and intervene as necessary.

3. Moving the inflow point from groin to the knee.

This is an important concept. One of the principles of inflow restoration is delivering large flow and pressure directly from the aortic source to the leg. Recanalizing from the external iliac to the below knee popliteal artery creates this situation below the knee, allowing for very short bypasses to be performed from the popltieal artery to tibial targets -a very useful circumstance when vein is limited. This next patient is a presented with gangrene of his fifth toe after esophagectomy for cancer, and had severe diabetes.

prepvr2

He had useful saphenous vein in his thigh only, some of it having been harvested in the proximal thigh for a common femoral endarterectomy. CTA showed a dilated common femoral and profunda femoral artery, severely calcified SFA and popliteal artery which were occluded, and only a patent peroneal artery as runoff.

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The plan was to harvest the short segment of vein then through the same incisions, below the knee and in the mid thigh, expose the below knee popliteal artery and tibial origins, and the mid SFA. I intended to avoid the groin. The plaque was removed from the tibioperoneal trunk to the SFA origin, and the origin was stented.

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This reestablished a normal inflow at the level of the below knee popliteal artery. I also did an eversion endarterectomy of the anterior tibial artery which resulted in significant back bleeding -a good sign. A short bypass was performed from the below knee popliteal artery to the peroneal artery.

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This resulted in a palpable dorsalis pedis artery pulse and excellent peroneal and posterior tibial artery signal.

completion

The ABI improved and the waveforms predicted healing for his 5th ray amp.

post abi2

This last case illustrates the point that once the conceptual inflow point is moved to the below knee popliteal artery, bypasses can become short, and durable tibial revascularizations become feasible. By avoiding a redo groin, avoiding multisegment arm vein bypass, and keeping the procedure time under 5 hours, the operation remains less invasive.

When Better is Better Than Good

original bypass

The dictum that better is the enemy of good is one of the old chestnuts carried around surgery training forever. It is an admonition against an unhealthy perfectionism that arises from either vanity or self doubt, and in the worse cases, both. The typical scenario is a surgeon trying to make a textbook picture perfect result and finding the patient’s tissues lacking, will take down their work to make it better, and repeat this process while the patient and everyone else in the room lingers.

Trying to avoid this, many surgeons will try to avoid any difficulties -the bad patch of scar tissue, irradiated body parts, areas of prior infection. But the mental contortions involved in avoiding “perfect” can result in actual physical contortions that in the end don’t pay off in good enough. I have not been immune to this, and I don’t think any physician or surgeon can honestly say they haven’t experienced some variation on this.

This patient is a younger middle aged man who in his youth experienced a posterior dislocation of his left knee, resulting in an arterial transection. This was repaired with an in-situ graft. Subsequently, he had complications of osteomyelitis and had his knee fused after resection of his joint. He did well with this bypass for several decades, but it finally failed several years ago, and a new one was created (image above).

Rather than directing the graft in line as in the previous one, this was was taken from a medial exposure of the femoral artery and tunneled superficially around the fused knee to coil lateral, ending in the anterior tibial artery.

This graft in turn thrombosed and was lysed by the outside surgeons and underwent serial interventions of proximal and distal stenoses at the anastomoses. The patient, when I met him, was contemplating an above knee amputation as a path to returning to work as a nurse in a rural hospital.

While there should be no reason long bypasses should do any less better than short bypasses, I do have to say these things about this patient’s bypass:

  1. No vein is perfect and the longer your bypass, the more chances you will have that a segment of bad vein will end up in your bypass
  2. Turning flow sharply can cause harsh turbulence. Turbulence can cause transition of potential energy into kinetic energy which acts to damage intimal, resulting in intimal hyperplasia.
  3. Thrombosis is a sure sign that your graft is disadvantaged, and the longer the period of thrombosis, the longer the intima “cooks” in the inflammatory response that accompanies thrombosis, making the vein graft even more vulnerable to subsequent intimal hyperplasia, thrombosis, or stricture.
  4. A high flow, small diameter vein graft entering a larger, disease free bed results in more turbulence but also Bernoulli effects that cause the graft to close intermittently, vibrating like one of those party favors that make a Bronx Cheer (a Heimlich valve). This is the cause I think of the distal long segment narrowing on this graft.

This patient was decided on amputation when our service was consulted, and after reviewing his CTA, I offered balloon angioplasty as his symptoms were primarily of paresthesia and neuropathic pain. I used cutting balloons and got angiographically satisfactory results.

intervention

The patient, although he admitted to feeling much better, was sad. He relayed that he had felt this way several times before, only to have his life interrupted by pain and weakness signaling a restenosis.

 

A direct graft would require about 10 centimeters of vein
 
It was only a month later when I heard the patient had returned with the same symptoms. He wasn’t angry nor full of any “I told you so” that frankly I was muttering to myself. Reviewing his CTA, he had restenosed to a pinhole. The vein, to use a scientific term, was “no good.”

The other interesting finding was that he had an abundance of very good vein. Following surgical dictum, his original and subsequent surgeons had used his vein from his contralateral saphenous vein. His right leg, fused at the knee, lacked a good calf muscle pump action. While there were no varicose veins, the greater and lesser saphenous veins were large and generous conduits, at least by 3DVR imagery, confirmed on duplex (image below, white arrows).

veins
3DVR showing presence of potential conduit

The extant arteries were smooth and plaque-free. I decided to harvest his lesser saphenous vein and through the same incision expose his distal superficial femoral artery and tibioperoneal trunk. While I anticipated some scarring, I was confident that the sections of artery I wanted to expose were easy to access because of some distance from the fused knee.

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On left short saphenous vein was harvested then same exposure used to expose TP Trunk

The picture shows the exposure and reversed vein graft in-situ, using the segment of lesser saphenous vein. As in prior experience in redo surgery, you can never know if a dissection will be easy or hard simply based on fear or concern for breaking something. It’s not until you start bushwacking –carving through scar and dealing with extraneous bleeding will you learn whether it was easy or hard. You can only be certain it was necessary. The only hitch was the femoral artery while well exposed, was buried in scar, and I chose not to get circumferential control as I was fairly deep, and had avid backbleeding from a posteriorly oriented collateral that required a mass clamp of the deep tissues.

Will this work better? Don’t know but it has a good chance, and I think a better chance. It is a large vein oriented in a straight path over a short distance going from good artery to good artery. This is better theoretically than a long meandering bypass with smaller vein. 

Saving a patient from hip disarticulation with advanced hybrid inflow procedure and vein bypasses

PREOP.001

The patient is an elderly man who had bilateral above knee amputations after failure of aortobifemoral bypass grafts at an outside institution. Unfortunately, he had no femoral pulses and his amputation on the right broke down (image above). His left stump had erosion of his femur to the skin with rest pain as well, but was at least covered by skin for now. He was declared too sick for hip disarticulations and was sent to a hospice where he failed to pass away. After a year there, he was sent to us for an evaluation.

He was suffering from rest pain and had complete breakdown of the skin over his amputation stump. More worrisome was the development of gangrenous scrotal and decubitus ulcers which were small but persistent and also foci of pain. CTA showed the following:

PREOP CTA.001

The aorta was occluded below his renal arteries. An AV fistula near his common femoral vein lit up his right iliac vein on the CT above. He had had a prior aortobifemoral bypass but this was occluded. Gratifyingly, it was anastomosed proximally end to side, giving us options. As with any revascularization, we had an inflow source -his aorta, and several potential outflow sources (CTA below, contrast filling iliac vein from AVF’s).

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In particular, his distal profunda femoral artery showed promise. Vein mapping revealed a short segment of basilic vein in his arm to use as bypass, but we needed inflow from the aorta.

I have come to appreciate two things about aortoiliac recanalization. First is that passing the wire antegrade is far likelier to stay in the true lumen at least in the aortic inflow segment -retrograde wire passage inevitably dissects the occlusive aortic plaque and reentry into the true lumen of the diseased aorta is just as challenging as in the leg. The second is vein bypasses have excellent patency in challenging conditions -you just need excellent inflow and an arterial bed to perfuse.

My plan was to cross the aortoiliac occlusion with a wire from the left arm. Once the right iliac system was entered, it didn’t matter if I was in a subintimal plane. The wire could be seated in the common femoral artery to access with a surgical exposure. Once this was done, my intention was to perform remote endarterectomy of the external iliac artery and stent from the aorta to the common iliac artery. The endarterectomized external iliac artery would be the inflow source of a later staged ilio-cross femoral bypass to revascularize his left AKA stump. The common femoral artery at its origin would provide inflow to a short vein bypass to his profound femoral artery.

The wire passed readily into the right iliofemoral system and a groin exposure and common femoral arteriotomy allowed me to retrieve the wire which had been passed from the left arm. A remote endarterectomy was performed over the wire which I do to ensure access in case the artery ruptures (specimen below).

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This allowed me to place a sheath into the right iliac system in the now reopened external iliac artery. Balloon angioplasty of the aortoiliac segment created working space for placement of balloon expandable stents from the infrarenal aorta to the common iliac artery, restoring an excellent pulse in the right groin.

The profunda femoral artery was encased in scar tissue, but following the occluded PFA from the CFA, I was able to expose an open segment and cut it open in the scar tissue. There was back bleeding, and I controlled the artery by placing a small Argyll shunt into the artery and reperfusing it from the recanalized right iliac system.

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The Doppler flow in the shunt was excellent, suggesting great outflow potential. The bypass was performed over the shunt with reversed basilic vein. Completion arteriography showed excellent flow.

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The amputation stump was debrided of dead bone and muscle and the graft was covered with a sartorius muscle flap.

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Before and after images are shown. The remaining open wound granulated well, and ultimately accepted a split thickness skin graft. His scrotal and decubitus ulcers healed as well (below at 6 months post op).

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His left AK stump subsequently degraded while he recovered so three months after this operation, he underwent a right external iliac to left profunda femoral artery bypass with cadaveric vein.

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I don’t like using cadaveric vein, but we really had no options. The right external iliac artery was approached through a right lower quadrant (transplant) incision and a punch biopsy of the artery revealed only normal adventitia on pathology. The EIA was soft and sewed well -essentially a normal artery brought back from the dead. The left profound femoral artery was large after endarterctomizing its origin and accepted the bypass flow well.

The mortality from hip disarticulation in the setting of gangrene and infection is very high, and I feel that standard approaches to this problem -prosthetic axillo femoral bypasses, thoracobi-femoral bypasses, in the setting of advanced infection and gangrene were unlikely to succeed. In over 1.5 years of followup, everything has remained patent, and the patient lives independently.

The best last conduit is your own artery

  

 

The patient is a 60 year old with severe peripheral vascular disease. Risk factors included smoking, hypertension, and type I diabetes. The patient had developed gangrenous eschar over toes 1, 2, and 3. He had had prior bilateral femoropopliteal bypasses with saphenous vein, which was occluded on his symptomatic side, and stent grafts had been placed on his distal femoral to popliteal artery, but these were occluded. He also had chronic edema with some early lipodermatosclerosis and pitting edema. He was emaciated and had a low prealbumin. 

CTA showed diffuse aortoiliac atherosclerosis with a severe stenosis in the proximal common femoral artery.

 

The femoropopliteal stent grafts were occluded but the popliteal artery reconstituted into a diseased set of tibial vessels -only the posterior tibial artery remained patent into the foot and remained as a target.

  

Preoperative angiography corroborated the CT findings.

  

  

 

The preoperative vein mapping suggested there was an acceptable anterior thigh tributary vein and marginal segments of vein below the knee. Arm vein was available as well. 

My plan was to explore the veins on his legs and expose his CFA and BKPOP along with the posterior tibial artery. If the veins were inadequate, I would proceed with open endarterectomy of the common femoral artery and remote endarterectomy of the external iliac artery and stenting of the diffusely diseased common iliac artery and remote endarterectomy of the femoropopliteal segment above the stent to use as inflow for a shorter bypass with the vein we had. 

Exploration showed that the anterior thigh vein was thin walled and became diminutive in the mid thigh. The infrageniculate veins were numerous and too small. I thought I might have enough for a short bypass from a recanalized mid SFA. 

The remote endarterectomy of the external iliac and stenting of the common iliac went without complications. I do this over a wire to ensure access in case of rupture. A postop CTA shows the results in the aortoiliac segment.

  

Remote endarterectomy of the SFA went smoothly but was held up by calcified plaque above the occluded stents. 

SFA plaque

I cut down on the SFA and found that the vein from the thigh would be short. I mobilized the plaque and re engaged the Vollmer ring and was able to dissect the stents. By starting another dissection from the below knee popliteal artery, the stent was mobilized and removed.

Viabahn stent grafts, occluded, removed

The figure below shows the procedure angiographically. I used a tonsil clamp to remove the mobilized stents.

Left, prior to remote endarterectomy, Mid -stent removal, Right -completion

The common femoral and mid SFA arteriotomies were repaired with patch angioplasties. The infrageniculate popliteal arteriotomy was used as inflow to a very short reversed vein bypass with the best segment of thigh vein to a soft posterior tibial artery.

Before and after of thigh segment

 

Before and after, the CTA on right is late in phase and has venous contrast.

Before and after, centerline.

The patient had a palpable posterior tibial artery pulse at the ankle. CTA predicted the plaque found in the tibioperoneal trunk which compelled me to do the short bypass. In my experience, remote endarterectomy, sometimes with short single segment bypass, successfully restores native vessel circulation without need for lengthy multisegment arm vein bypass. Remote endarterectomy of the external iliac artery avoids the difficult CFA plaque proximal end point that often requires stenting across the ligament down to the patch. Only a single common iliac stent is required. I generally anticoagulate these patients with warfarin, especially if they are likely to resume smoking or have poor runoff. I hope to show this is the equal of multisegment vein bypass, and superior to it by virtue of avoiding long harvest incisions which are the source of much morbidity and now readmissions which are penalized.

     

Aorto-femoral bypass -still useful in 2014

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From my archives, the CTA illustrates two points. First, tunneling can be done without taking down much of the retroperitoneum. This lesson came to me after taking a course in laparoscopic aortic surgery with Dr. Dion in Quebec City. The old BARD-IMPRA tunnelers with their bullet tips -the short gently curved one, is particularly well suited for tunneling from the groin to the aorta -if you have a hand on the retroperitoneal pelvis, it is very straightforward to guide the tunneler to the proper location. The other point is that the graft is applied proximally end to side with a leftward orientation. This combined with dissection of the retroperitoneum with a large Ligasure or harmonic scalpel lets you avoid the problem of having no tissues to close over the graft. You take down the retroperitoneum with a cuff of tissue of about 5cm from the duodeum. Normally, this can be bloody but with the energy devices, it is not. This provides excellent graft coverage. You just have to mind the IMV which may or may not have to be taken down. End to side is preferred because you preserve endovascular options, but in this case, the anastomosis was done end to end.

April 30, 2009 11:33 PM

Aortic Bypass for occlusive disease

The patient arrived with the history of severe claudication. He was a middle
age smoker whose job required walking several miles a day. This became
increasingly difficult until he was clearly limping at short distances. He was
also developing cramps in his legs at night, worse in his left leg.

On examining him, he had no pulses in his left leg from the groin down.
The pulse volume recordings (PVR’s, red lines) on the left clearly
demonstrate normal flows in his right leg with sharp upstrokes, dicrotic
notch, and shallow diastolic relaxation. The left leg had attenuated flows on
the pulse volume recordings with dampened, gradual series of mounds.
The flow was flat at the metatarsal level (foot). His ankle brachial index
( BI) on the right leg was 0.75 which was mildly depressed. The ABI on his
left leg was 0.43 which was severely depressed.

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CT was performed (above left) showing that his left iliac system was
occluded. This is due to atherosclerosis which is a systemic disease. This
kind of blockage can occur in any organ, but it was most severe in this
patient’s leg. His right common iliac artery also had moderate plaque.

He underwent an aorto-right iliac and left femoral artery bypass with a
bifurcated graft (above right). This greatly improved flows in his left leg, with
his BI improving to 1.05 from 0.43. The PVR’s also reflect this improved
flow. The right leg, surprisingly, also had an improvement despite not
having a severe stenosis in his common iliac artery. The fact is, the
common iliac artery, but being heavily diseased over the length of the
artery, offered a hemodynamically significant stenosis despite being patent.
His BI on the right improved from 0.75 to 1.03.

IMG_1177.JPG

The operation was done with minimal invasiveness in mind. The CT
allowed for planning of the abdominal incision directly over the part of the
aorta requiring operation. The groin incision on the left was created
obliquely as to avoid crossing the groin crease -which I believe increases
the chances for tension on the wound and subsequent infection. The graft was tunneled without mobilizing the sigmoid colon directly up to the bifurcation using an IMPRA tunneler -by placing the hand in the pelvis, the
tunneler can be felt and guided in the correct trajectory. The graft was a
Gelsoft Plus graft soaked in Rifampin. This antibiotic bonds to the gelatin in
the graft giving protection against indolent bacterial infections for about 3-6
months after the procedure -this is helpful especially with groin incisions. The operation took 2.5 hours and the patient went home within a few days.

The patient is now walking without pain and will be returning to work. He
has also successfully quit smoking which has a significant impact on his
risks of future heart attack, stroke, or peripheral vascular complication. His
relative youth (in his fifties) required that we give him a repair that would
give him the best chance at maintaining patency for many years. The aortic
bypass graft for occlusive disease has a proven track record with patency
measured in decades.