The Interrupted Natural History of Aortic and Iliac Artery Aneurysms

graphic

The patient, now in his 90’s, found out about his aortic and iliac artery aneurysms in his early 80’s, had been offered repair, but had refused. Several years ago, one of my partners emergently repaired his ruptured AAA (abdominal aortic aneurysm) via a retroperitoneal approach using a tube graft. At the time of the repair of the AAA, the common iliac artery aneurysms (CIAA’s) were not ruptured and would have added risky time to the repair. He survived and had a postop CT done about two years ago which showed his CIAA’s.

CT 5cm L CIAA 2014.png
Two years ago
The patient chose not to pursue repair of these aneurysms, I assume figuring that at his age, he’d again take the chance that he would pass on without the hassle of another procedure.

He was recently admitted for treatment of another condition, when his physicians noted a large visible pulsatile mass on his lower abdomen.

CIAA

A CT scan was performed. It showed a 13 cm left common iliac artery aneurysm which was responsible for the visible puslatile mass and a large right common iliac artery aneurysm. The left internal iliac artery was thrombosed. His right common iliac artery aneurysm was over 5cm in size.

CT 13cm L CIAA preop

My partner, Dr. Ezequiel Parodi, was consulted for this case. He performed a percutaneous EVAR. The procedure was made difficult by tortuosity in iliac artery and the tube graft in the aorta requiring a secondary access from the arm to straighten out and advance the stent graft (aka body floss).

Dr. Ezequiel Parodi
 
In followup, the aneurysms decreased in size and showed no endoleak around a patent stent graft.

CT postop L CIAA (1)

Common iliac artery aneurysms expand at a rate proportional to their starting size and have increased rates of expansion in those with prior aortic aneurysm expansion (ref 1). Rupture probably signals a tendency to expand rapidly. There is evidence that iliac ectasia and aneurysms left over after tube graft repair (aorto-aortic) of AAA is benign and can be safely observed (ref 2), but these were all small at the start.

I had been trained at the dusk of the open surgical era and the dictum was aortobi-iliac bypasses to avoid future problems with the iliac arteries. With EVAR, and soon bifurcated iliac branched stent-grafts (currently on trial), staged repair of metachronous iliac aneurysms after tube graft repair of AAA has not only an appeal, but some logic as open bypass to iliac bifurcations, particularly in large men, is challenging and potentially morbid. This is a case of a patient who had a large iliac aneurysm that was not repaired initially due to the exigencies of ruptured AAA and had refused planned staged repair. His aneurysm grew from over 5cm to 13cm in 2 years time without rupturing. Such good fortune is very rare.

Vascular surgeons like to collect large aneurysm stories like fishermen talk about big fish. This is the largest unruptured common iliac artery aneurysm I have seen. While it is baffling to many who are in healthcare, it is important to understand noncompliance is common. Denial is a powerful urge, and a uniquely human one.

2014-03-25

 

References

  1. J Vasc Surg. 2009 Apr;49(4):881-5
  2. Surgery. 2008 Nov;144(5):822-6.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s